Both the killing and captivity of dolphins are ethically indefensible. This is not an emotional claim. It is based on hard science.
— Thomas I. White, who is the Conrad N. Hilton Professor in Business Ethics at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, writing in the Times’ Dot Earth blog about ethical issues raised by the brutal slaughter of dolphins in Japan. 

Well, going to Sri Lanka is not going to happen now. This spider is the size of “your face.”

jtotheizzoe:

The Nature of Origami

Bernie Peyton uses some of the best animal origami I’ve ever seen to call attention to threatened species and remind us that nature’s treasures (the living ones, not the paper ones) are worth protecting. Check out his gallery … I bet you can’t pick out a favorite!

swinglargo:

chronophotographs from the late 1800s (pre cinema) by Étienne-Jules Marey

swinglargo:

chronophotographs from the late 1800s (pre cinema) by Étienne-Jules Marey

greghaystuff:
There are only 3,200 Tigers left?!?! Wow. 
(via There Are Only 3,200 Tigers Left | Motherboard - Image source)

Well. That’s a good reminder to revisit Alan Rabinowitz's must watch PopTech talk on saving big cats.

greghaystuff:

There are only 3,200 Tigers left?!?! Wow. 

(via There Are Only 3,200 Tigers Left | Motherboard - Image source)

Well. That’s a good reminder to revisit Alan Rabinowitz's must watch PopTech talk on saving big cats.

Interactive map shows the locations of 25,000 species
Knowing the distribution of species around the world will help officials decide how to focus conservation efforts.

(via mothernaturenetwork)

Can One Incredibly Stubborn Person Save a Species?

In 1979 another in a growing line of alien species hitched a ride on a fishing skiff from a remote village on Mexico’s Baja California peninsula to land on Rasa Island, a tiny sun-blasted wafer of rock in the Gulf of California. The invader was Enriqueta Velarde, a petite 25-year-old Mexican graduate biology student who looked 18, with a comely smile and an adventuring heart. It was the launch of her Ph.D. research into one of the island’s resident species, the Heermann’s gull, a petite, pretty bird about which almost nothing was known. In fact, little was known of the island beyond its desolate oddities: thousands of mysterious stone cairns and pathways thought to have been made by guano miners in the 19th century, three wooden crosses marking unremembered graves, a stone hut crumbling with the region’s frequent temblors.

Eriqueta Velarde has saved two species, mostly on her own. And she’s not the only keystone lady saving entire ecosystems. Go, go, go read Julia Whitty’s #longread from our latest issue. (via motherjones

"Markia hystrix" spotted by Rachelle Smith in Panama.

One of the wildest examples of camouflage we’ve seen yet! This lichen-mimicking katydid blends in masterfully with the trees and rocks it climbs.

(via Project Noah)

The Biodiversity Project by Joels Sartore

For many of Earth’s creatures, time is running out. Half of the world’s plant and animal species will soon be threatened with extinction. The goal of the Biodiversity Project is simple: to show what’s at stake, and to get people to care, while there’s still time to save them.  More than 1,800 species have been photographed to date, with more to come.

(via NPR’s Morning Edition)