vimeo:

Theo Jansen by Salazar

Theo Jansen may not refer to himself as an artist, but the genius kenetic sculptures that bloom from his hands beg to differ. 

Beautiful new video of the magnificent work of Theo Jansen (PopTech 2005). 

vimeo:

“Kinetic Rain” Changi Airport Singapore by ART+COM

Travellers passing through the departure check-in terminal at the Singapore Airport won’t be singing “Rain, Rain, Go away” when they encounter this kinetic beauty. 

mirandamolina:

In the left, the original Jansen’s mechanism with it’s walking curve, and in the right, a simplified version.

A la izquierda, el mecanismo original de Jansen y su “curva de caminata”, y a la derecha una versión simplificada.

(vía Geometría Dinámica » El mecanismo de Jansen)

Blending the line between art and engineering, Theo Jansen (PopTech 2005), a Dutch visual artist creates “life” in the form of “animals” that walk the beach in the Netherlands.

experimentsinmotion:

Jewelry in motion: Kinetic architecture for your hands

by Dukno Yoon

We have always been fascinated with kinetic art at PopTech. 

theatlantic:

Kinetic Sculptures

Theo Jansen spends his days creating beautiful pieces that can live on the beach, where they are powered by the wind, forever.

[via Tony Comstock]

Blending the line between art and engineering, this Dutch visual artist creates “life” in the form of “animals” that walk the beach in the Netherlands.

20 playsDownload

Caterpillar’s Innards Move Before It Does. Makes us look at Reuben Margolin’s kinetic sculptures of caterpillars differently, for sure.

Listen to more episodes of 60-Second Science from Scientific American.

First inspired by the mysterious and mathematical qualities of a caterpillar’s crawl, Reuben Margolin creates large-scale kinetic sculptures that use pulleys and motors to create the complex movements and structures we see in nature. Check out this beautiful video of one of his mechanical waves in action.

Reuben created a similar custom wave that was installed at the Camden Opera House last fall for PopTech 2009 where he shared some of his other extraordinary mechanical installations.

Reuben is currently building ‘Nebula,’ a multi-tiered, geometric structure made of more than 10 miles of aircraft cable, 1,780 pulleys and over 4,500 amber crystals. Measuring almost 100 feet long and 50 feet wide, it is the largest mechanism he has ever built. The artwork will be installed inside the Hilton Anatole hotel in Dallas, TX this fall.

theshadownose:

The sine wave or sinusoid is a mathematical function that describes a smooth repetitive oscillation. It occurs often in pure mathematics, as well as physics, signal processing, electrical engineering and many other fields.

Illustrating the sine wave's fundamental relationship to the circle.

We see this concept come alive in the kinetic art of Reuben Margolin who was first inspired by the mysterious and mathematical qualities of a caterpillar’s crawl and now creates large-scale kinetic sculptures that use pulleys and motors to create the complex movements and structures we see above.