And in the news? The end of the news (newspapers, at least).

futurejournalismproject:

Syria Deeply, Beat Page of the Future
It’s an incredible idea: one site, one beat. No front page. No sports, no business or finance, anywhere. It’s called Syria Deeply.
It’s about 25% original content, written by veteran Middle East correspondent Lara Setrakian and friends. The rest is aggregated and includes interactives, maps, and contextual material aimed to catch people up on the story without pointing them off site.
From FastCompany:

From a taxonomy perspective, Syria Deeply is the opposite of most news sites. In a traditional news taxonomy, information is divided by broad topics, like World News. Each topic is divided into subsections, like the Middle East. Each subsection is then often divided into even smaller subsections, like Syria. Each section gets smaller and smaller. Topic pages live in obscure ghettos on many news websites: auto-aggregated and ugly dumping grounds for content that happens to be tagged with particular keywords.
On Syria Deeply (designed by Brock Petrie and developed by Soumyadeep Paul and Arindam Biswas, who runs Collective Zen) the topic page is the homepage. Setrakian’s hope is that this site-wide focus on a single beat will allow for deeper, more thoughtful reporting.

FJP: Looks extremely promising.

Context, context, context. Bravo. 

futurejournalismproject:

Syria Deeply, Beat Page of the Future

It’s an incredible idea: one site, one beat. No front page. No sports, no business or finance, anywhere. It’s called Syria Deeply.

It’s about 25% original content, written by veteran Middle East correspondent Lara Setrakian and friends. The rest is aggregated and includes interactives, maps, and contextual material aimed to catch people up on the story without pointing them off site.

From FastCompany:

From a taxonomy perspective, Syria Deeply is the opposite of most news sites. In a traditional news taxonomy, information is divided by broad topics, like World News. Each topic is divided into subsections, like the Middle East. Each subsection is then often divided into even smaller subsections, like Syria. Each section gets smaller and smaller. Topic pages live in obscure ghettos on many news websites: auto-aggregated and ugly dumping grounds for content that happens to be tagged with particular keywords.

On Syria Deeply (designed by Brock Petrie and developed by Soumyadeep Paul and Arindam Biswas, who runs Collective Zen) the topic page is the homepage. Setrakian’s hope is that this site-wide focus on a single beat will allow for deeper, more thoughtful reporting.

FJP: Looks extremely promising.

Context, context, context. Bravo. 

Can an Algorithm Write a Better News Story Than a Human Reporter?

Potentially Earth-Like Planet Has Right Temperature for Life

For the first time, astronomers have found a planet smack in the middle of the habitable zone of its sunlike star, where temperatures are good for life. “If this planet has a surface, it would have a very nice temperature of some 70° Fahrenheit [21°C],” says William Borucki of NASA’s Ames Research Center here, who is the principal investigator of NASA’s Kepler space telescope. “[It’s] another milestone on the journey of discovering Earth’s twin,” adds Ames director Simon “Pete” Worden.

thepoliticalnotebook:

Nobel Peace Prize winners.  From left to right: President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf of Liberia (AP Photo); Liberian activist Leymah Gbowee (AP); Yemeni Tawakul Karman who head the organisation Women Journalists Without Chains (AP). 

They were awarded the prize for “for their non-violent struggle for the safety of women and for women’s rights to full participation in peace-building work.” Johnson-Sirleaf is Liberia’s first elected female president and has acted as a reformer in her time in office. Gbowee organized a group of Christian and Muslim women to stand up to Liberian warlords. Karman is a Yemeni journalist who is both a women’s rights activist and a leading protest organiser in Yemen’s Arab Spring uprisings.

Read the AP Story.

pulitzercenter:

The Revolutions Were Tweeted — a stunning visualization of information flows on Twitter during the 2011 Tunisian and Egyptian uprisings. Go play.

globalvoices:

What do you need to get online in rural Africa?

Find out from Boukary Konaté, from Rising Voices grantee project Segou Village Connection.

Hacking Together Rural Internet 

Spread of Earthquake-Related Tweets

miguelrios:

Below is a visual of the Tweets from VA and Washington, DC one minute after the August 23 #earthquake.

This is an official Twitter visualization we created to see how far and fast a tweet can travel. This is part of what we do on Twitter’s analytics team. Join us: http://twitter.com/jobs .

Chris Hughes's Jumo And GOOD Join Forces

GOOD, publisher of the magazine by the same name and the social action platform is acquiring Jumo, the cause-oriented social network created by Facebook and team Barack Obama veteran Chris Hughes.

utnereader:

(via Designboom)

In a device platform that spans communications, human-machine interfaces and gaming, and medical diagnostics, ultrathin electronics can be worn as simply and unobtrusively as a temporary tattoo with the system developed by a research team led by Todd Coleman and John Rogers of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Yonggang Huang of Northwestern University. Sensors and communication electronics are embedded into flexible transparent sheets that stick to skin. The unobtrusive quality of the device opens the potential for a host of measurements and control systems that could offer more accurate day-to-day data than laboratory figures (when patients are in unnatural conditions), while the use of other kinds of electronic modules permits covert communications and physiological-directed gaming.