reaktorplayer:

100-Feet-Long-Blue-Whale-Kite by the New Zealand engineer and inventor Peter Lynn

Jay Silver is an inventor who created Makey Makey, a kit that allows users to turn everyday objects into touchpads and combine them with the Internet, like creating a piano out of bananas. He endorses art that is a “hodge-podge of different collections of contributions reflecting everyone’s own internal inspirations, kind of the way nature is, but for humans.”

“I come here today because I am excited about data, but also because I am terrified. I am terrified that we are having progress without culture in the world of data.”

Jer Thorpwho has launched The Office For Creative Research, explores the boundaries between science, data, art, and culture. His work has appeared in the Museum of Modern Art in Manhattan. 

UP: The Umbrella Project, created by Pilobolus in collaboration with the MIT Distributed Robotics Laboratory, premiered on Friday, October 12th at PopTech in the Camden Harbor Amphitheater in Camden, Maine. Functioning as individuals in a group - or pixels on a screen - participants wielding umbrellas fabricated with multi-colored LED lights, created a performance piece together that was projected in real time on a large screen.

Starring the PopTech conference attendees and the Camden community, this Pilobolus piece, like all of the modern performance company’s work over the last 42 years, was borne out of its proven method of collective creativity.

Pilobolus outdoor Umbrella Project comes to PopTech Camden

Pilobolus is a venerable modern performance company that convenes groups of diverse artists to create athletic, collaborative works on stage and screen using the human body as a medium for expression.

During the PopTech conference on Friday night, Oct 19, from 6:00-7:00p.m., Pilobolus will enlist several hundred volunteers to participate in a large-scale, live performance using umbrellas fabricated with multi-colored LED lights created by the MIT Distributed Robotics Laboratory. The performance will be simultaneously projected onto a large screen.

Volunteers are welcome on the spot. Whether you choose to participate or simply observe, remember to dress warm and join us at the Bok Amphitheater in Camden for a great show brought to you by Pilobolus, the MIT Distributed Robotics Laboratory and your friends in the PopTech community.

experimentsinmotion:

Asobi by Yasutoki Kariya
“Asobi” was created by art student Yasutoki Kariya for his senior thesis exhibition. Meaning “play,” the installation is comprised of 11 computer-programmed incandescent light bulbs hung from strings. They playfully re-enact Newton’s Cradle, visualizing the transfer of kinetic energy in the form of light. (via Spoon & Tamago)

experimentsinmotion:

Asobi by Yasutoki Kariya

“Asobi” was created by art student Yasutoki Kariya for his senior thesis exhibition. Meaning “play,” the installation is comprised of 11 computer-programmed incandescent light bulbs hung from strings. They playfully re-enact Newton’s Cradle, visualizing the transfer of kinetic energy in the form of light. (via Spoon & Tamago)

There’s always something brewing in the PopTech community. From the world-changing people, projects and ideas in our network, a handful of this week’s highlights follows.

  • This week, Thomas Thwaites (PopTech 2011) of The Toaster Projectwas interviewed on The Rumpus. Thwaites talks about wondering where things come from, ruining his mother’s microwave and taking another crack at building a toaster from scratch…on TV. 
  • Bloomberg profiles PopTech 2011 Social Innovation Fellow Paul Needham's pay-as-you-go solar venture, Simpa Networks.

If you’d like to receive a stream of these updates (and more) throughout the week in real time, follow us on TwitterTumblrFacebook, sign up for our newsletter, and subscribe to the PopTech blog.

Image: Thomas Thwaites

thoughtyoushouldseethis:

The new, world-record holding Rube Goldberg machine. As the guy says at the end of the video, “we need to go home.” Or as my colleague Peter Gorgio put it, “file under people with too much time on their hands.” Nerdily adorable.

[via io9]

Rube Goldberg machines? Can’t get enough of them