Remix the Public Domain

palimpsestghost:

The Past Re-imagined as the Future
“What’s the potential of open digital libraries? Artists everywhere are invited to mix video from the incredible Prelinger Archives with audio from the Free Music Archive to create new masterpieces for the commons.”
Have you seen this STOP SOPA screen today? Wonder where it came from? The man behind the screen is none other than Zach Johnson.  
On GitHub he explains: 

Hi, I’m Zach, and I made this for the internet. I felt inspired by the “going dark” theme of the SOPA blackout protest. I’ve been calling my representatives in Congress, but this gave me another outlet for my frustration with this legislation.
I place this code in the public domain. I require no attribution.

Have you seen this STOP SOPA screen today? Wonder where it came from? The man behind the screen is none other than Zach Johnson.  

On GitHub he explains

Hi, I’m Zach, and I made this for the internet. I felt inspired by the “going dark” theme of the SOPA blackout protest. I’ve been calling my representatives in Congress, but this gave me another outlet for my frustration with this legislation.

I place this code in the public domain. I require no attribution.

Firstly, we want to make more people aware of the public domain as a valuable asset which everyone is free to enjoy, use and share. Many people understand the public domain as an accidental bi-product of copyright, but we want more people to think of it as a positive good: a shared cultural commons which belongs to no-one (and hence to everyone!) and into which all works inevitably pass.

Secondly, we want to enable more people to be able to use public domain works. Digital technologies mean these works can move around in a frictionless world: without cost, without registration, and without restrictive conditions on their use. Unfortunately many institutions and companies are inclined to assert their ownership on digital copies of public domain artifacts. We want to encourage them not to.

Dr Julius Neubronner’s Miniature Pigeon Camera

In 1903 Dr Julius Neubronner patented a miniature pigeon camera activated by a timing mechanism. The invention brought him international notability after he presented it at international expositions in Dresden, Frankfurt and Paris in 1909–1911. Spectators in Dresden could watch the arrival of the camera-equipped carrier pigeons, and the photos were immediately developed and turned into postcards which could be purchased. 

From our new favorite site, The Public Domian Review